Streamlined care from a specialist. An example of cost effectiveness: Just knowing…

Why would referring a patient directly to a specialist save money, time and patient outcomes? Exhibit A: A 75 year old male presents to his family doctor with a heart rate of 120.   Just some palpitations and a little “funny feeling in my chest.”  No pain, no shortness of breath, no dizziness. Examination shows a… Continue reading Streamlined care from a specialist. An example of cost effectiveness: Just knowing…

A bad day for simplicity today…

The daily silliness as pictured on the wall of a heart catheterization lab… Now, one can’t say the words mild, moderate or severe. CMS, the government, or the payer, in describing blockages, no longer recognizes descriptive words. To a non-squisher cardiologist this seems silly. Let it be known that the exact percent blockage of a… Continue reading A bad day for simplicity today…

The “happiness quotient” and healthcare reform and Tiger…

Here is a surprise: Doctors and hospitals oppose the recent medicare provision. Us cardiologists are also opposed to the looming 50% cuts in medicare reimbursement. Imagine. Is this good news? Certainly not, how would anyone feel about earning 50% less? Will this cause access problems for the 65 and up patients; you bet it will.… Continue reading The “happiness quotient” and healthcare reform and Tiger…

A quest for intelligence. A long way off…

While perusing the aisles in Kroger, to an English professor and dean at a local university, I inquire about a writing course, so as to improve the blog. This author labored to a C in English in high school and despite excelling in the sciences in math, struggled like a muscleman on a cx course… Continue reading A quest for intelligence. A long way off…

Think critically about treatment recommendations: The H1N1 example…

Patients are asking me about the H1N1 vaccine. Usually, as a “one more thing” question at the tail end of a visit. This question churns the angst machine. The face twists in unknowing. It doesn’t have to be so bad. Could just give the party line and say, “get the shot.” Have a nice day… Continue reading Think critically about treatment recommendations: The H1N1 example…

Know the opposite of something and you know something…

I have yet to figure out the theme for the blog. Is it exercise? Or healthy living? Or medical? Cycling? What exactly? So far, in reflecting on the posts, the only consistent theme I can figure is the “master of the obvious” thread. In the electrophysiology (EP) lab, you have to locate where an arrhythmia… Continue reading Know the opposite of something and you know something…

A Cranberry question highlight our ways of knowing…

Technology has changed things in so many ways. When I was Will’s age (12) there were no remote controls, a rotor which turned our antenna on the roof for better TV reception of the 4 channels and no cell phones, heck-there were rotary dial phones. Information was less accessible as well. There was a building… Continue reading A Cranberry question highlight our ways of knowing…

A Guest Blog. Not only a plan for exercise; a plan for life.

My good friend Bob Bobrow volunteered a guest blog. A major stimulus for my entree into words stems from many hours traveling to races with Bob. He is a lawyer so is better with words than I. Take your time with these words. They are the essence of what I tell patients about exercise. Once… Continue reading A Guest Blog. Not only a plan for exercise; a plan for life.

Stem Cells

I started my day today reading the front page of CJ. The medical breakthroughs article caught my eye. http://www.courier-journal.com/section/News01&template=project&theme=research Why does reading about cardiac stem cell transplant make me remember this photo. I took it for a lecture on “Heart Disease Prevention.” The stem cell thing is fascinating. The research is compelling and the scientists… Continue reading Stem Cells