A good bye and a thank you…

A little self-absorption tonight.  A pledge to keep this triviality to a minimum going forward, but it is my blog and herein lies the beauty of the blog-o-sphere.

Tomorrow is my last day at my current job.  I have worked with the same private practice group since 1996.   The senior partner at the time, Dr Richard Allen, said to me that first year, “John, always do what is right for the patient and good results will happen.”  With all the background noise in medicine these days, this simple advice still rings true.

The new job is with a “competing” group whose office is a mere 500 meters away.  Louisville Cardiology is their name.  An unwavering friend, a “squisher,” is there, they are good doctors, the two senior members names end in vowels and most importantly, they act like they like me.  Nice.

Enough already. Sorry, a touch more to add.

The doctors in my departing group with whom I have most directly worked with at Baptist are fine people.  They have my respect as doctors and people.  There is no ill will.

The staff in my office will be missed.  They are also exceptional people who have consistently worked for their patients, tirelessly, patiently and with a sincere goodness.  How should I know this?  Not only has it been 14 years in the same office, but also, I worked in a neighboring cubicle rather than the secluded office and as many know cubicles hold few secrets.  These “good peoples” also helped me; in their service to the patients, but more so with their patience, and grace, and tolerance of me, which more often than I would like to admit was challenging.  So, I say Thank You!

With any separation there is angst.  Some in my present group may have competitive concerns about me joining a neighboring practice.   This is flattering – so thanks.  Secondly, we practice in Kentucky, so worrying about competition for the care of heart disease would seem akin to two fishermen worried about competing in a hatchery.

The nerves of a new job, new people and new chapters are good sensations indeed.

JMM

3 comments

  1. I wish you the best John anyone that knows you even a little knows you are a sincere,caring and dedicated human being. They are lucky to have you joining them.I'll be anxious to read about you first day. Your fan!!!!!

  2. Congratulations and the best of luck as you make this change in your life. I hope it brings you the joy and satisfaction you're hoping for. Oh — and Happy New Year, Dr. John!
    -Wren

Comments are closed.

A good bye and a thank you…

A little self-absorption tonight.  A pledge to keep this triviality to a minimum going forward, but it is my blog and herein lies the beauty of the blog-o-sphere.

Tomorrow is my last day at my current job.  I have worked with the same private practice group since 1996.   The senior partner at the time, Dr Richard Allen, said to me that first year, “John, always do what is right for the patient and good results will happen.”  With all the background noise in medicine these days, this simple advice still rings true.

The new job is with a “competing” group whose office is a mere 500 meters away.  Louisville Cardiology is their name.  An unwavering friend, a “squisher,” is there, they are good doctors, the two senior members names end in vowels and most importantly, they act like they like me.  Nice.

Enough already. Sorry, a touch more to add.

The doctors in my departing group with whom I have most directly worked with at Baptist are fine people.  They have my respect as doctors and people.  There is no ill will.

The staff in my office will be missed.  They are also exceptional people who have consistently worked for their patients, tirelessly, patiently and with a sincere goodness.  How should I know this?  Not only has it been 14 years in the same office, but also, I worked in a neighboring cubicle rather than the secluded office and as many know cubicles hold few secrets.  These “good peoples” also helped me; in their service to the patients, but more so with their patience, and grace, and tolerance of me, which more often than I would like to admit was challenging.  So, I say Thank You!

With any separation there is angst.  Some in my present group may have competitive concerns about me joining a neighboring practice.   This is flattering – so thanks.  Secondly, we practice in Kentucky, so worrying about competition for the care of heart disease would seem akin to two fishermen worried about competing in a hatchery.

The nerves of a new job, new people and new chapters are good sensations indeed.

JMM